Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Jolla launch party

And then for something completely different, I've my hands on Jolla now, and it's beautiful!

A quick dmesg of course is among first things to do...
[    0.000000] Booting Linux on physical CPU 0
[    0.000000] Initializing cgroup subsys cpu
[    0.000000] Linux version (abuild@es-17-21) (gcc version 4.6.4 20130412 (Mer 4.6.4-1) (Linaro GCC 4.6-2013.05) ) #1 SMP PREEMPT Mon Nov 18 03:00:49 UTC 2013
[    0.000000] CPU: ARMv7 Processor [511f04d4] revision 4 (ARMv7), cr=10c5387d
[    0.000000] CPU: PIPT / VIPT nonaliasing data cache, PIPT instruction cache
[    0.000000] Machine: QCT MSM8930 CDP
... click for the complete file ...
And what it has eaten: Qt 5.1!
... click for the complete file ...
It was a very nice launch party, thanks to everyone involved.

Update: a few more at my Google+ Jolla launch party gallery

Workaround for setting Full RGB when Intel driver's Automatic setting does not work


I upgraded from Linux 3.8 to 3.11 among with newer Mesa, X.Org and Intel driver recently and I found a small workaround was needed because of upstream changes.

The upstream change was the Add "Automatic" mode for "Broadcast RGB" property, and defaulting to the Automatic. This is a sensible default, since many (most?) TVs default to the more limited 16-235, and continuing to default to Full from the driver side would mean wrong colors on the TV. I've set my screen to support the full 0-255 range available to not cut the amount of available shades of colors down.

Unfortunately it seems the Automatic setting does not work for my HDMI input, ie blacks become grey since the driver still outputs the more limited range. Maybe there could be something to improve on the driver side, but I'd guess it's more about my 2008 Sony TV actually having a mode that the standard suggests limited range for. I remember the TV did default to limited range, so maybe the EDID data from TV does not change when setting the RGB range to Full.

I hope the Automatic setting works to offer full range on newer screens and the modes they have, but that's probably up to the manufacturers and standards.

Below is an illustration of the correct setting on my Haswell CPU. When the Broadcast RGB is left to its default Automatic setting, the above image is displayed. When set to Full, the image below with deeper blacks is seen instead. I used manual settings on my camera so it's the same exposure.


For me the workaround has evolved to the following so far. Create a /etc/X11/Xsession.d/95fullrgb file:
if [ "$(/usr/bin/xrandr -q --prop | grep 'Broadcast RGB: Full' | wc -l)" = "0" ] ; then
/usr/bin/xrandr --output HDMI3 --set "Broadcast RGB" "Full"
And since I'm using lightdm, adding the following to /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf means the flicker only happens once during bootup:


Important: when using the LightDM setting, enable executable bits (chmod +x) to /etc/X11/Xsession.d/95fullrgb for it to work. Obviously also check your output, for me it was HDMI3.

If there is no situation where it'd set back to "Limited 16:235" setting on its own, the display manager script should be enough and having it in /etc/X11/Xsession.d is redundant and slows login time down. I think for me it maybe went from 2 seconds to 3 seconds since executing xrandr query is not cheap.


Note that unrelated to Full range usage, the Limited range at the moment behaves incorrectly on Haswell until the patch in bug #71769 is accepted. That means, the blacks are grey in Limited mode even if the screen is also set to Limited.

I'd prefer there would be a kernel parameter for the Broadcast RGB setting, although my Haswell machine does boot so fast I don't get to see too many seconds of wrong colors...

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Latest Compiz gaming update to the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS

A new Compiz window manager performance update reached Ubuntu 12.04 LTS users last week. This completes the earlier [1] [2] enabling of 'unredirected' (compositing disabled) fullscreen gaming and other applications for performance benefits.

The update has two fixes. The first one fixes a compiz CPU usage regression. The second one enables unredirection also for Intel and Nouveau users using the Mesa 9.0.x stack. That means up-to-date installs from 12.04.2 LTS installation media and anyone with original 12.04 LTS installation who has opted in to the 'quantal' package updates of the kernel, X.Org and mesa *)

The new default setting for the unredirection blacklist is shown in the image below (CompizConfig Settings Manager -> General -> OpenGL). It now only blacklists the original Mesa 8.0.x series for nouveau and intel, plus the '9.0' (not a point release).

I did new runs of OpenArena at from a 12.04.2 LTS live USB. For comparison I first had a run with the non-updated Mesa 9.0 from February. I then allowed Ubuntu to upgrade the Mesa to the current 9.0.3, and ran the test with both the previous version of Compiz and the new one released.

12.04.2 LTS    Mesa 9.0   | Mesa 9.0.3 | Mesa 9.0.3
               old Compiz | old Compiz | new Compiz
OpenArena fps    29.63    |   31.90    | 35.03     

Reading into the results, Mesa 9.0.3 seems to have improved the slowdown in the redirected case. That would include normal desktop usage as well. Meanwhile the unredirected performance remains about 10% higher.

*) Packages linux-generic-lts-quantal xserver-xorg-lts-quantal libgl1-mesa-dri-lts-quantal libegl1-mesa-drivers-lts-quantal. 'raring' stack with Mesa 9.1 and kernel 3.8 will be available around the time of 12.04.3 LTS installation media late August.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Network from laptop to Android device over USB

If you're running an Android device with GNU userland Linux in a chroot and need a full network access over USB cable (so that you can use your laptop/desktop machine's network connection from the device), here's a quick primer on how it can be set up.

When doing Openmoko hacking, one always first plugged in the USB cable and forwarded network, or like I did later forwarded network over Bluetooth. It was mostly because the WiFi was quite unstable with many of the kernels.

I recently found out myself using a chroot on a Nexus 4 without working WiFi, so instead of my usual WiFi usage I needed network over USB... trivial, of course, except that there's Android on the way and I'm a Android newbie. Thanks to ZDmitry on Freenode, I got the bits for the Android part so I got it working.

On device, have eg. data/ with the following contents.

ip addr add dev usb0
ip link set usb0 up
ip route delete default
ip route add default via;
setprop net.dns1
echo 'nameserver' >> $CHROOT/run/resolvconf/resolv.conf
On the host, execute the following:
adb shell setprop sys.usb.config rndis,adb
adb shell data/
sudo ifconfig usb0
sudo iptables -A POSTROUTING -t nat -j MASQUERADE -s
echo 1 | sudo tee /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward 
sudo iptables -P FORWARD ACCEPT
This works at least with Ubuntu saucy chroot. The main difference in some other distro might be whether the resolv.conf has moved to /run or not. You should be now all set up to browse / apt-get stuff from the device again.

Update: Clarified that this is to forward the desktop/laptop's network connection to the device so that network is accessible from the device over USB.
Update2, 09/2013: It's also possible to get working on the newer flipped images. Remove the "$CHROOT" from nameserver echoing and it should be fine. With small testing it got somehow reset after a while at which point another run of data/ on the device restored connection.

Tuesday, May 07, 2013

Qt 5 in Debian and Ubuntu, patches upstreaming


I quite like the current status of Qt 5 in Debian and Ubuntu (the links are to the qtbase packages, there are ca. 15 other modules as well). Despite Qt 5 being bleeding edge and Ubuntu having had the need to use it before even the first stable release came out in December, the co-operation with Debian has gone well. Debian is now having the first Qt 5 uploads done to experimental and later on to unstable. My work contributed to pkg-kde git on the modules has been welcomed, and even though more work has been done there by others, there haven't been drastic changes that would cause too big transition problems on the Ubuntu side. It has of course helped to ask others what they want, like the whole usage of qtchooser. Now with Qt 5.0.2 I've been able to mostly re-sync all newer changes / fixes to my packaging from Debian to Ubuntu and vice versa.

There will remain some delta, as pkg-kde plans to ask for a complete transition to qtchooser so that all Qt using packages would declare the Qt version either by QT_SELECT environment variable (preferable) or a package dependency (qt5-default or qt4-default). As a temporary change related to that, Debian will have a debhelper modification that defaults QT_SELECT to qt4 for the duration of the transition. Meanwhile, Ubuntu already shipped the 13.04 release with Qt 5, and a shortcut was taken there instead to prevent any Qt 4 package breakage. However, after the transition period in Debian is over, that small delta can again be removed.

I will also need to continue pushing any useful packaging I do to Debian. I pushed qtimageformats and qtdoc last week, but I know I'm still behind with some "possibly interesting" git snapshot modules like qtsensors and qtpim.


More delta exists in the form of multiple patches related to the recent Ubuntu Touch efforts. I do not think they are of immediate interest to Debian – let's start packaging Qt 5 apps to Debian first. However, about all of those patches have already been upstreamed to be part of Qt 5.1 or Qt 5.2, or will be later on. Some already were for 5.0.2.

A couple of months ago Ubuntu did have some patches hanging around with no clear author information. This was a result of the heated preparation for the Ubuntu Touch launches, and the fact that patches flew (too) quickly in place into various PPA:s. I started hunting down the authors, and the situation turned out to be better than I thought. About half of the patches were already upstreamed, and work on properly upstreaming the other ones was swiftly started after my initial contact. Proper DEP3 fields do help understanding the overall situation. There are now 10 Canonical individuals in the upstream group of contributors, and in the last week's sprint it turned out more people will be joining them to upstream their future patches.

Nowadays about all the requests I get for including patches from developers are stuff that was already upstreamed, like the XEmbed support in qtbase. This is how it should be.

One big patch still being Ubuntu only is the Unity appmenu support. There was a temporary solution for 13.04 that forward-ported the Qt 4 way of doing it. This will be however removed from the first 13.10 ('saucy') upload, as it's not upstreamable (the old way of supporting Unity appmenus was deliberately dropped from Qt 5). A re-implementation via QPA plugin support is on its way, but it may be that the development version users will be without appmenu support for some duration. Another big patch is related to qtwebkit's device pixel ratio, which will need to be fixed. Apart from these two areas of work that need to be followed through, patches situation is quite nice as mentioned.


Free software will do world domination, and I'm happy to be part of it.

Sunday, May 05, 2013

Whee!! zy

Congrats and thanks to everyone,

Debian 7.0 Wheezy released

Updating my trusty orion5x box as we speak. No better way to spend a (jetlagged) Sunday.

Friday, March 08, 2013

Mobile and products from the perspective of Debian

I didn't want to spam Debian Planet with largely Ubuntu related post, but in general I think this is very relevant for Debian Mobile, and I close up the post with Debian :)

I want products

I'd like to modify my discussion comment and earlier thoughts into a short blog post touching only some of the technical concerns voiced, and my opinion to those.

Claim (my version): Ubuntu/Canonical is going the "Google route" to become another Android, while Android has not benefited the Linux ecosystem in any way, forking everything

Firstly, Ubuntu is open to development and community for also mobile and tablet - Android has none of that, just code drops that get modded. (yes, some people have a problem with CLA like Canonical's or Qt's, I have no problem with those - let's keep that discussion elsewhere). Ubuntu contributes back to Debian and upstream projects like Qt - those upstream projects it's not upstream of itself. There are not too many free software mobile UIs for example. SHR has some E17 apps, Nemo Mobile a handful of Qt apps and so on.

Secondly, I disagree about Android - even in its current shape and after creating everything from scratch with mobile on mind, Android has done tremendous things for the free software community, kernel development, mobile device driver and making things like Replicant possible. If those aren't directly seen on the desktop side, that's because it's not the desktop and most free software desktop users don't use free software mobile products (usually at most a vendor provided Android).

I feel people get too attached to software projects or even the desktop in general. The money to pay desktop has traditionally largely come from the server. As a discussion-heating example Wayland has been a great promise for 5 years and continues to be, yet no products use it (software products like distributions or hardware+software products). That's not a problem per se for a great and ambitious project, but it means no interested party has taken it to create products. I was very excited about Gallium3D and Wayland in 2008, but somewhat optimistic in believing they would conquer the world in one or two years. In perspective, I've always seen the "version staring" a common habit in enthusiasts me included. I think it extents to "shiny development projects that should be taken into production use immediately".

The Nokia N9 triumphs all other 2011 mobile phones in general and even the current user interfaces like iOS, Android and Windows Phone in general usability ideas (if only it'd run Cortex-A15 instead of OMAP3..). It uses and Qt 4.7. Jolla's plans for their first phone at the end of this year? Qt 4.8, no Wayland. Like N9 which otherwise had unfortunate fate, I hope Jolla will sell millions of free software wielding products to the masses. The biggest problem with is, though, the drivers, generally zero support from vendors so hard to make products. Hooking into Android EGL drivers and building on top of that seems a good compromise at the moment. Note that from product creation point of view it's not the non-shininess of that IMHO is the blocker. Wayland and Mir may help on the driver side.

I want products!

I'd love to see more push to have actual products on the market, since otherwise we don't get free software to the masses. If Mir helps Ubuntu to do that in one year, fine (I don't know how it's going to be). Yes Mir is a new shiny project, but it's a very product/target oriented project one. If Android would be open as a project, it wouldn't hurt - other than feelings attached to the other projects especially by the core developers and fans of those - if it was the superior alternative from product creation perspective making all of, upstart, systemd, Wayland, Pulseaudio, D-Bus, glibc less interesting to product creators while even more interest would go to Android. It's not so now, Android is not an open project in any sense, even though still beneficial for free software. Ubuntu will keep using a lot more of the traditional stack anyway than Android (which also just got rid of BlueZ), but I have zero problem of changing any of the components if it's visioned to be required to get finished, ready to use products out. IMHO the key is to get products out, and I hope all the parties manage to do that.

Of the traditional GNU/Linux desktop distributions only Ubuntu seems to be adapting for the mobile in large steps at the moment. The other distributions in the mobile playing field are: (Android/)Replicant, Mer/Sailfish, Firefox OS, Tizen, added with OpenEmbedded based distributions like SHR. Have you used those on a daily basis on your devices? I believe you should. I think KDE will bring with its Plasma Active - currently focusing on building on top of Mer - mobile power to the traditional GNU/Linux distributions, but otherwise it's all up to the new players - and Ubuntu.

Like many know, I used Debian exclusively on my primary phone for ca. two years before switching mostly to N9. During all that time, I already pondered why people and distributions are so focused on x86 and desktop. And the reason is that that's what their history is, and I stared at the wrong place - desktop distributions. I dismissed Android and some of the small newcomers in the mobile distro playing field, but it seems that big changes are needed to not need completely new players. I think Ubuntu is on the completely right track to both benefit from the history and adapt for the future. I still hope more developers to Debian Mobile, though!! Debian should be the universal operating system after all.

Disclaimer: I'm an Ubuntu community person from 2004, Debian Developer since 2008 and a contractor for Canonical for ca. 1 year. My opinions haven't changed during the 1 year, but I've learned a lot more of how free software is loved at Canonical despite critics.